Journal cover Journal topic
Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
CP cover
Co-editors-in-chief:
Marie-France
 
Loutre
Denis-Didier
 
Rousseau
Marit-Solveig
 
Seidenkrantz
 &
Eric
 
Wolff

Climate of the Past (CP) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and discussion of research articles, short communications, and review papers on the climate history of the Earth. CP covers all temporal scales of climate change and variability, from geological time through to multidecadal studies of the last century. Studies focusing mainly on present and future climate are not within scope.

News

New article processing charges for CP

05 Dec 2017

From 1 January 2018 Climate of the Past (CP) will slightly increase the article processing charges.

Press release: Climate changes triggered immigration to America in the 19th century

21 Nov 2017

From Trump to Heinz, some of America's most famous family names and brands trace their origins back to Germans who emigrated to the country in the 19th century. Researchers from the University of Freiburg have now found that climate was a major factor in driving migration from Southwest Germany to North America during the 19th century. The results are published today in CP.

Climate of the Past's most prolific editor steps down

15 Nov 2017

Volker Rath, who has been an editor of CP since it started, has decided to step down. He holds the title of CP's most prolific editor, having supervised the passage of at least 88 papers. The CP chief editors want to record huge thanks to him: it is the willingness of our editors to work on papers both within and around their field that enables the success of the journal.

Recent articles


Highlight articles

Ice cores reveal that atmospheric CO2 concentration varied synchronously with the global ice volume. Explaining the mechanism of glacial–interglacial variations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations and the link between CO2 and ice sheets evolution still remains a challenge. Here using the Earth system model of intermediate complexity we performed for the first time simulations of co-evolution of climate, ice sheets and carbon cycle using the astronomical forcing as the only external forcing.

Andrey Ganopolski and Victor Brovkin

Stratigraphic trends in the carbon isotope composition of calcium carbonate rock can be used as a stratigraphic tool. An important assumption when using these isotope chemical records is that they record a globally universal signal of marine water chemistry. We show that carbon isotope scatter on a confined centimetre stratigraphic scale appears to represent a signal of microbial activity. However, long-term carbon isotope trends are still compatible with a primary isotope imprint.

Martin Schobben, Sebastiaan van de Velde, Jana Gliwa, Lucyna Leda, Dieter Korn, Ulrich Struck, Clemens Vinzenz Ullmann, Vachik Hairapetian, Abbas Ghaderi, Christoph Korte, Robert J. Newton, Simon W. Poulton, and Paul B. Wignall

This paper presents the extent to which climate, harvest and prices influenced the major migration waves from southwest Germany into North America during the 19th century, a century of dramatic climatic and societal changes.

Rüdiger Glaser, Iso Himmelsbach, and Annette Bösmeier

Regional Antarctic snow accumulation derived from 79 ice core records is evaluated as part of the PAGES Antarctica 2k working group. Our results show that surface mass balance for the total Antarctic ice sheet has increased at a rate of 7 ± 0.13 Gt dec-1 since 1800 AD, representing a net reduction in sea level of ~ 0.02 mm dec-1 since 1800 and ~ 0.04 mm dec-1 since 1900 AD. The largest contribution is from the Antarctic Peninsula.

Elizabeth R. Thomas, J. Melchior van Wessem, Jason Roberts, Elisabeth Isaksson, Elisabeth Schlosser, Tyler J. Fudge, Paul Vallelonga, Brooke Medley, Jan Lenaerts, Nancy Bertler, Michiel R. van den Broeke, Daniel A. Dixon, Massimo Frezzotti, Barbara Stenni, Mark Curran, and Alexey A. Ekaykin

Ice ages are paced by astronomical parameters. On longer timescales, the astronomy also acts on climate, as evidenced by the 400 kyr signature observed in carbon isotopic records. In this paper, I present a conceptual model that links the astronomy to the dynamics of organic carbon in coastal areas. The model reproduces the carbon isotopic records and a two-step decrease in atmospheric CO2 that would explain the Pleistocene (~2.8 Myr BP) and mid-Pleistocene (~0.8 Myr BP) transition.

Didier Paillard

Publications Copernicus