Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 3.174 IF 3.174
  • IF 5-year value: 3.841 IF 5-year 3.841
  • CiteScore value: 3.48 CiteScore 3.48
  • SNIP value: 1.078 SNIP 1.078
  • SJR value: 1.981 SJR 1.981
  • IPP value: 3.38 IPP 3.38
  • h5-index value: 42 h5-index 42
  • Scimago H index value: 58 Scimago H index 58
CP cover
Co-editors-in-chief:
Uwe
 
Mikolajewicz
,
Denis-Didier
 
Rousseau
,
Marit-Solveig
 
Seidenkrantz
&
Eric
 
Wolff
Climate of the Past (CP) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and discussion of research articles, short communications, and review papers on the climate history of the Earth. CP covers all temporal scales of climate change and variability, from geological time through to multidecadal studies of the last century. Studies focusing mainly on present and future climate are not within scope.
News
Marie-France Loutre stepped down as chief editor 10 Aug 2018

Marie-France Loutre has left the team of chief editors of CP, but will remain on the editorial board as a regular editor. Being an active player within CP leadership, the remaining chief editors are grateful to Marie-France for her friendship and her strong commitment over the last several years. Modelling will still be well represented as Uwe Mikolajewicz has joined the team of chief editors, alongside Marit-Solveig Seidenkrantz, Eric Wolff, and Denis-Didier Rousseau.

New Journal Impact Factors released 27 Jun 2018

The latest Journal Citation Reports® have been published by Clarivate Analytics.

Extended agreement with the Leibniz Association 03 May 2018

As of 1 May 2018 the centralized payment of article processing charges (APCs) with the Leibniz Association has been extended to 53 Leibniz Institutions participating in the Leibniz Association's Open Access Publishing Fund.

Recent articles

Highlight articles

In the context of a warming climate, mountain environments are especially vulnerable to a change in the risk pattern. Our study focuses on the past evolution of wet avalanches, likely triggered by warmer temperatures destabilizing the snow cover. In the last 3300 years we observed an increase of wet avalanche occurrence related to human activities, intensifying pressure on forest cover, as well as favorable climate conditions such as warmer temperatures coinciding with retreating glacier phases.

Laurent Fouinat, Pierre Sabatier, Fernand David, Xavier Montet, Philippe Schoeneich, Eric Chaumillon, Jérôme Poulenard, and Fabien Arnaud

We present two new palaeoclimatic records for the central Maya lowlands, adding valuable new insights to the impact of climate change on the development of Maya civilisation. Lake Tuspan's diatom record is indicative of precipitation changes at a local scale, while a beach ridge elevation record from the world's largest late Holocene beach ridge plain provides a regional picture.

Kees Nooren, Wim Z. Hoek, Brian J. Dermody, Didier Galop, Sarah Metcalfe, Gerald Islebe, and Hans Middelkoop

Glaciers provide iconic illustrations of past climate change, but records of glacier length fluctuations have not been used systematically to test the ability of models to reproduce past changes. One reason is that glacier length depends on several complex factors and so cannot be simply linked to the climate simulated by models. This is done here, and it is shown that the observed glacier length fluctuations are generally well within the range of the simulations.

Hugues Goosse, Pierre-Yves Barriat, Quentin Dalaiden, François Klein, Ben Marzeion, Fabien Maussion, Paolo Pelucchi, and Anouk Vlug

This study presents organic acid levels in an ice core from Svalbard over the past 800 years. These acids are produced from wildfire emissions and transported as aerosol. Organic acid levels are high early in the record and decline until the 20th century. Siberia and Europe are likely the primary source regions of the fire emissions. The data are similar to those from a Siberian ice core prior to 1400 CE. The timing of the divergence after 1400 CE is similar to a shift in North Atlantic climate.

Mackenzie M. Grieman, Murat Aydin, Elisabeth Isaksson, Margit Schwikowski, and Eric S. Saltzman

The climate of the last glacial period was frequently interrupted by rapid warming events, the cause of which is still unknown. One open question is whether the occurrence of events is random or externally controlled. We studied the temporal characteristics of warm and cold phases using statistical null models and find that they are well described as random processes modulated by two different external climate factors. This may help distinguish physical mechanisms for rapid climate change.

Johannes Lohmann and Peter D. Ditlevsen

Publications Copernicus