Journal cover Journal topic
Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 3.382 IF 3.382
  • IF 5-year<br/> value: 3.684 IF 5-year
    3.684
  • SNIP value: 1.210 SNIP 1.210
  • IPP value: 3.845 IPP 3.845
  • SJR value: 2.401 SJR 2.401
  • h5-index value: 33 h5-index 33
CP cover
Co-editors-in-chief:
Carlo
Barbante
,
Nerilie
 
Abram
Thorsten
 
Kiefer
Marie-France
 
Loutre
 &
Denis-Didier
 
Rousseau

Climate of the Past (CP) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and discussion of research articles, short communications, and review papers on the climate history of the Earth. CP covers all temporal scales of climate change and variability, from geological time through to multidecadal studies of the last century. Studies focusing mainly on present and future climate are not within scope.

News

Direct settlement of APCs for scientists from the University of Potsdam

01 Jul 2015

The Potsdam University Library and Copernicus Publications have signed an agreement on direct settlement of article processing charges (APCs).

Update data policy

29 Jun 2015

We have updated our data policy: it now also refers to the Data Citation Principles and stresses the necessity of data availability.

Introduction of post-discussion editor decision

18 Jun 2015

Climate of the Past has introduced the post-discussion editor decision into the review process. With this extra step, the authors are given clear instructions on how to revise their paper.

Recent articles


Highlight articles

Fluid inclusions inside stalagmites retain information on the cave temperature at the time they formed and thus can be used to reconstruct the continental climate of the past. A method for extracting this information based on a thermodynamic model and size measurements of femtosecond-laser-induced vapour bubbles is presented. Applying our method to stalagmites taken from the Milandre cave in the Swiss Jura Mountains demonstrate that palaeotemperatures can be determined with an accuracy of ±1°C.

F. Spadin, D. Marti, R. Hidalgo-Staub, J. Rička, D. Fleitmann, and M. Frenz

We propose an innovative framework to organize paleodust records, formalized in a publicly accessible database, and discuss the emerging properties of the global dust cycle during the Holocene by integrating our analysis with simulations performed with the Community Earth System Model. We show how the size distribution of dust is intrinsically related to the dust mass accumulation rates and that only considering a consistent size range allows for a consistent analysis of the global dust cycle.

S. Albani, N. M. Mahowald, G. Winckler, R. F. Anderson, L. I. Bradtmiller, B. Delmonte, R. François, M. Goman, N. G. Heavens, P. P. Hesse, S. A. Hovan, S. G. Kang, K. E. Kohfeld, H. Lu, V. Maggi, J. A. Mason, P. A. Mayewski, D. McGee, X. Miao, B. L. Otto-Bliesner, A. T. Perry, A. Pourmand, H. M. Roberts, N. Rosenbloom, T. Stevens, and J. Sun

Climate and ice sheet models are often used to predict the nature of ice sheets in Earth history. It is important to understand whether such predictions are consistent among different models, especially in warm periods of relevance to the future. We use input from 15 different climate models to run one ice sheet model and compare the predictions over Greenland. We find that there are large differences between the predicted ice sheets for the warm Pliocene (c. 3 million years ago).

A. M. Dolan, S. J. Hunter, D. J. Hill, A. M. Haywood, S. J. Koenig, B. L. Otto-Bliesner, A. Abe-Ouchi, F. Bragg, W.-L. Chan, M. A. Chandler, C. Contoux, A. Jost, Y. Kamae, G. Lohmann, D. J. Lunt, G. Ramstein, N. A. Rosenbloom, L. Sohl, C. Stepanek, H. Ueda, Q. Yan, and Z. Zhang

All regional monsoons belong to a cohesive global monsoon circulation system, albeit thateach regional subsystem has its own indigenous features. A comprehensive review of global monsoon variability reveals that regional monsoons can vary coherently across a range of timescales, from interannual up to orbital and tectonic. Study of monsoon variability from both global and regional perspectives is imperative and advantageous for integrated understanding of the modern and paleo-monsoon dynamics.

P. X. Wang, B. Wang, H. Cheng, J. Fasullo, Z. T. Guo, T. Kiefer, and Z. Y. Liu

Here, we provide the first estimate of the impact of the development of the Laurentide ice sheet on the estimates of energy and temperature reconstructions from measurements of terrestrial borehole temperatures in North America. Results indicate that site-specific heat content estimates over North America can differ by as much as 50%, if the energy contribution of the last glacial cycle in those areas of North America that experienced glaciation is not taken into account when estimating recent subsurface energy changes from borehole temperature data.

H. Beltrami, G. S. Matharoo, L. Tarasov, V. Rath, and J. E. Smerdon

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