Journal cover Journal topic
Climate of the Past An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
CP cover
Co-editors-in-chief:
Carlo
Barbante
,
Nerilie
 
Abram
Thorsten
 
Kiefer
Marie-France
 
Loutre
 &
Denis-Didier
 
Rousseau

Climate of the Past (CP) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and discussion of research articles, short communications, and review papers on the climate history of the Earth. CP covers all temporal scales of climate change and variability, from geological time through to multidecadal studies of the last century. Studies focusing mainly on present and future climate are not within scope.

News

Press Release: The Coldest Decade of the Millennium? How the cold 1430s led to famine and disease

01 Dec 2016

While searching through historical archives to find out more about the 15th-century climate of what is now Belgium, northern France, Luxembourg, and the Netherlands, Chantal Camenisch noticed that many of the 1430s' winters and some springs were extremely cold in the Low Countries, as well as in other parts of Europe.

Geographical distribution of views now available in journal ALMs

08 Sep 2016

Copernicus Publications has extended the article level metrics (ALMs) by showing the geographical distribution of views. This information is available for articles published after 3 August 2016.

Institutional agreement for CP authors affiliated with the Leibniz Association

01 Sep 2016

Copernicus Publications and the Leibniz Association have agreed on a central billing of article processing charges (APCs) to facilitate the publication procedure for authors. So far three Leibniz institutes are participating in this agreement.

Recent articles


Highlight articles

Throughout the last millennium, several cold periods occurred which affected humanity. Here, we investigate an exceptionally cold decade during the 15th century. The cold conditions challenged the food production and led to increasing food prices and a famine in parts of Europe. In contrast to periods such as the "Year Without Summer" after the eruption of Tambora, these extreme climatic conditions seem to have occurred by chance and in relation to the internal variability of the climate system.

Chantal Camenisch, Kathrin M. Keller, Melanie Salvisberg, Benjamin Amann, Martin Bauch, Sandro Blumer, Rudolf Brázdil, Stefan Brönnimann, Ulf Büntgen, Bruce M. S. Campbell, Laura Fernández-Donado, Dominik Fleitmann, Rüdiger Glaser, Fidel González-Rouco, Martin Grosjean, Richard C. Hoffmann, Heli Huhtamaa, Fortunat Joos, Andrea Kiss, Oldřich Kotyza, Flavio Lehner, Jürg Luterbacher, Nicolas Maughan, Raphael Neukom, Theresa Novy, Kathleen Pribyl, Christoph C. Raible, Dirk Riemann, Maximilian Schuh, Philip Slavin, Johannes P. Werner, and Oliver Wetter

This paper focuses on early Holocene rapid climate changes in the Mediterranean zone, which are under-represented in continental archives, and on their impact on prehistoric societies from the eastern to central Mediterranean (central Anatolia, Cyprus, NE and NW Greece). Our study demonstrates the reality of hydrogeomorphological responses to early Holocene RCCs in valleys and alluvial fans and lake-marsh systems. We finally question their socio-economic and geographical adaptation capacities.

J.-F. Berger, L. Lespez, C. Kuzucuoğlu, A. Glais, F. Hourani, A. Barra, and J. Guilaine

Past intervals in Earth history provide unique windows into conditions much different than those observed today. We investigated the paleoenvironments of a past warm interval (~3 million years ago). Our reconstruction includes data sets for surface temperature, vegetation, soils, lakes, ice sheets, topography, and bathymetry. These data are being used along with global climate models to expand our understanding of the climate system and to help us prepare for future changes.

H. Dowsett, A. Dolan, D. Rowley, R. Moucha, A. M. Forte, J. X. Mitrovica, M. Pound, U. Salzmann, M. Robinson, M. Chandler, K. Foley, and A. Haywood

We use an isotope-equipped GCM and develop original theoretical expression for the precipitation composition to assess δ18O of paleo-precipitation changes with the Tibetan Plateau uplift. We show that δ18O of precipitation is very sensitive to climate changes related to the growth of mountains, notably changes in relative humidity and precipitation amount. Topography is shown to be not an exclusive controlling factor δ18O in precipitation that have crucial consequences for paleoelevation studies.

S. Botsyun, P. Sepulchre, C. Risi, and Y. Donnadieu

This study presents an average of seven Late Pleistocene sea level records, which improves the signal-to-noise ratio for estimates of sea level change during glacial cycles of the past 800 000 years.

R. M. Spratt and L. E. Lisiecki

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